THE SANCTIFIED AND THE NON-SANCTIFIED: WHY INTRINSIC MUSLIM CONSUMERS OFTEN DIGRESS THE HALAL CONSUMPTION ETHICS?

Authors

  • Dr. Théophile Bindeouè Nassè Thomas Sankara University / Saint Thomas D'Aquin University /Simon Diedong Dombo University of Business and Integrated Development Studies https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2288-6036

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.51594/ijmer.v3i6.235

Abstract

West African researchers have investigated consumption and religious beliefs to explain the weight of religion on individuals’ consumption behavior. However, studies that investigated intrinsic religious beliefs and consumption in the context are not common. The purpose of this research is to explore how intrinsic religious beliefs shape the Muslim consumer behavior in the sector of beverages. The approach is a quantitative one and based on a post-positivist stance. The results show that Muslims intrinsic religiosity has some sensitive effects on consumer behavior in a multi-religious environment tinted by extreme poverty, and a strong cultural heritage of consumption. Thus, the intrinsic religious beliefs effects on consumer behavior are sometimes characterized by some non-tolerant and violent attitude from the part of some consumers.

Keywords: Intrinsic Religiosity, Consumer Behavior, Islamic Ethics, Non-Alcoholic Drinks, Marketing.

Published

2021-07-12

Issue

Section

Articles